Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Shutter Speed - An Important Series for Point & Shoot, iPhones & dSLR Cameras


Shutter Speed - Post #1

As you read the post and study the information on shutter speeds, also note the shutter speed directly under each of the photos. What do you notice about the photos and shutter speeds?

Shutter Speed  = 1/80

My posts on aperture-f/stop were easy, right? This will be too. Leave any questions in your comment box.

With a Point & Shoot or iPhone shutter speed is set by shooting on automatic or the auto modes like action, portrait or macro. My Point & Shoot also has a specific shutter priority mode, yours may also. Check your camera's manual for setting shutter speed.

Shutter Speed = 1/250
On a dSLR, shutter speed is set automatically when using the various auto modes. When using the shutter priority mode or manual mode you set the shutter speed. Check your camera's manual on how to set priority mode.

Shutter Speed explained the easy way:

When you click the button on your camera to take a photo, the shutter opens and exposes the camera’s sensor to light. The shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter is open from the time the button is clicked to the time it returns to its original position. This action is called shutter speed or exposure time.

Shutter Speed = 1/650
Shutter speed is the length of time that your camera sensor ‘sees’ the scene you’re capturing.

Don’t get this confused with aperture-f/stop although the two work together and play an important role in the outcome of your photo.

Shutter speed is measured in seconds, or in most cases, fractions of seconds. The bigger the denominator is of the fraction the faster the speed. 1/1000th is much faster than 1/30th. A denominator is the number below the line in a common fraction like 1/30. So, 1/30 = 30.

Shutter Speed = 1/1000
A typical shutter speed range may look like this:

Shutter speeds: 1sec; 1/2sec; 1/4sec; 1/8th; 1/15th; 1/30th; 1/60th; 1/125th; 1/250th; 1/500th; 1/1000th; 1/2000th

When viewing shutter speed in your camera read-out, these fractions will show as a whole number: 1/60 reads as 60, etc.


As a very rough rule of thumb, use high shutter speeds like 1,000 or higher for fast moving objects. 500 is a good general shutter speed, for slow moving objects use 125 or 250. But – this is a very rough guide. We will discuss this more in my next post.


In most cases you’ll probably be using shutter speeds of 1/60th of a second or faster. This is because anything slower than this is very difficult to use without getting camera shake. Camera shake is when your camera is moving while the shutter is open and results in blur in your photos.

Shutter Speed = 1/2000
If you’re using a slow shutter speed, typically slower than 1/60th, you’ll need a tripod or a way to stabilize your camera. Setting your camera on a table or other stable object and using the self-timer works if you don’t have a tripod. If your camera offers vibration reduction turn it on. Your manual will tell you how.

We will discuss more on setting shutter speeds in my next post.

Meanwhile – happy clicking!






44 comments:

Mari Bruins said...

Great tutorial, Mari!

chintan said...

you are very good with details and description. that is why i like reading your blog :) helps me learn photography tips :D thank you xx

cheers,
chin

http://24x7clicks.blogspot.com

Rebecca R said...

Beautiful pictures!  I would love to learn how to take pictures like that.  Thank you, so much, for following my blog..I am now following you back :)  Have a fabulous rest of the week!

Rebecca @ www.ifonlylifecouldbethatsimple.blogspot.com

Jpbrandanophoto said...

Your really providing a great service for beginners here Mari. You always have great tips presented in a easy learning style!!! I wish I had a site like yours when I was starting out, although I didn't have the internet back then either lol


http://jpweddingphotograpy.blogspot.com/2011/09/collaboration-with-tameka-mullins.html

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Glad you enjoyed it! 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

I spent 4 years in college studying photography and fine arts - wish we'd had the internet - writing all those papers by hand was a pain. But I loved working in the photography darkroom - not something you can do online :D

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Thanks for following! I hope you learn lots here :D

judyastra1 said...

You take awesome pictures!  I look forward to the tips you give here. I got a Digital camera last Christmas and it took me some time to figure it out. I have learnt a lot and hope to get even better.  I am a new Follower of your Blog.
                                                                      Judy - JUDY H-J'S THOUGHTS

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Welcome aboard! Glad to have you here. :D

Anu Shoj said...

wow awesome...I hv a digital camera...and willing to buy slrnow....but I don't knw which is better....stick to the old one or buy a new one.... :(

SyedAlfandiSyedMansor said...

great tips as usual, Mari..I think nowadays is it is easier to get sharp photos handheld due to smaller lens..

Gb Sb said...

It really capture the moment. Nice photos!

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

I'll be doing a post soon on various popular cameras with suggestions on whether or not trading your current one in is necessary.

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

I agree. It's good to know where the safety net is.

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Thank you for your comment - I appreciate it. Hope to see you again. I enjoy your blog.

Mrs Catch said...

Great post. Concise and clear. The numbers are so useful and easy to remember. I laughed when I read your 1/1000 or above for action shots. I had worked that out over time myself. Very painfully :) Love your shots. They are so beautifully sharp and clear.

Sailor said...

Beautiful pictures! Thanks for the wonderful tips.

kriti said...

Mari - so if the shutter speed is slow it doesn't really mean that the camera is bad right? It just needs tripod support. Or am I wrong?

Savy1920 said...

I love the shot and the blue of the hydrangeas....

Isafrenchy said...

You are very good! Beautiful pictures! Following you back. Hope you are having a super day!
Frenchy

Tat said...

I had no idea that the shutter speed is different for action or portrait, or that it could be set at all for point & shoot cameras. Will definitely be checking the settings on mine. 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

You are welcome! Glad you are enjoying them. I've missed seeing posts from your blog....

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

You are right. The camera is not bad. Shutter speed is based on your camera setting. Example, in auto portrait mode the shutter speed is set by the camera for a slower speed than in auto action mode. In shutter priority mode (which is a semi-auto setting) you set the shutter speed as you also do in manual mode. I'll be getting into more of this in my next post. 

When the shutter speed is around 1/60th or lower is when a tripod is needed unless you have steady hands or what is called a "fast lens". A fast lens is expensive.  If you are using kit lens on a dslr, or a point and shoot type camera your lens will tend to be slow so a tripod is good. 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Glad you enjoyed the post and photos.

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Glad you are following. Have a super day. :D

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Good idea. Check your manual as each camera model is different. Depending on your camera, your settings may be called action, portrait, macro, etc and then the camera sets the shutter speed, aperture and a few other things for you. 

You do get better photographs when using the various auto modes rather than always using just the automatic mode for everything. 

Tameka Mullins said...

Hi Mari. I got so lost in the images that I forgot to read the tips! So I retraced my steps. I am just getting interested in photography so I will definitely print and save this post. Thanks a bunch! 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Glad you found it helpful! You might glance over some of my older posts for beginners. There's some on composition and some on using the camera's various auto modes to get beginning photographers off and running. Welcome to the wonderful world of photography!

Rogueartist said...

Keep it up!!  I am learning sooooo much!  Thanks for your comment on my post.  My little girl is not out of the woods, but she is imroving. 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Hope your pup is well soon! Glad you are learning from my blog. That's very gratifying.

cookingvarieties said...

Hi mari, all i can say is many thanks for the info, now I realized that there is such a vast difference in shutter speed. Wow, a camera with a vibration reduction feature..all these, no wonder the cheaper cameras are not worth buying.
Btw, my friend had been following your tutorial ever since, she loves your blog.

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

cookingvarieties has left a new comment on your post "Shutter Speed - An Important Series for Point & Sh...": Hi mari, all i can say is many thanks for the info, now I realized that there is such a vast difference in shutter speed. Wow, a camera with a vibration reduction feature..all these, no wonder the cheaper cameras are not worth buying. Btw, my friend had been following your tutorial ever since, she loves your blog. 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Wan - for some reason your comment didn't post so I put it on for you :D Thank you.

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

cookingvarieties has left a new comment on your post "This Moment - A Friday Ritual - Bubble Magic.........": hi mari, must be some green water plants, but all i can say is that this photo is exclusive and awesome.you picked the right pic 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Wan - your comment didn't post so I added it for you - thank you for the comment!.

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

From Mrs. Catch:  Mrs Catch has left a new comment on your post "Shutter Speed - An Important Series for Point & Sh...": 

Great post. Concise and clear. The numbers are so useful and easy to remember. I laughed when I read your 1/1000 or above for action shots. I had worked that out over time myself. Very painfully :) Love your shots. They are so beautifully sharp and clear. 

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

I've done the same - learning the painful way lol. Photographing toddlers and kids equates to fast shutter speeds lol.

Absurdtraveler said...

Great post, really well explained. Thanks!

David said...

Very nice photos..enjoy them all. You made the rotor blades on the helicopter look stationary though they're moving a blinding rate and that's very hard to capture. The teeple with blue sky and billowy clouds is so lovely, keep taking the amazing pics to share. Thanks for the lesson om shutter speed, always an area that we can improve in. Take care!!

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

So glad you enjoyed the post :D

lakwatsera de primera said...

Does the minimum shutter speed for handholding DLSR vary from one lens to another?

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Yes it does. It has to do with:
Your own abilities to hold the camera still, say vs. my abilities.
The aperture of the lens - say f1/4 vs f1/8 - the f1/4 lets in more light making it fast (shutter speed) at shooting the image.
The size and quality of the lens and how much light it lets into the camera sensor. I will remember to include this as part of a post as it's an excellent question.

I hope this helps answer your question. If not email me at mariwilbur@gmail.com :)

AkEem 'khym' MaRzon said...

what is the lens opening ans 

AkEem 'khym' MaRzon said...

what is the lens opening and i.s.o that flower blue?thank you i need now your reply asap